Current Courses

Our goal is to enhance the intellectual, social, and cultural life of adults by providing challenging, diverse, and relevant courses on academic topics. Most of our classes are four to six weeks long and meet once a week for 1-1/2 or 2 hours. Our volunteer instructors are motivated by their desire to share their knowledge and facilitate thoughtful discussions on academic topics.

We have two semesters: Fall and Winter/Spring.

Check out the great courses below and click here for instructions on creating a DavidsonLearns account, joining DavidsonLearns, and registering for Winter/Spring courses.

Fall 2022 Courses

We have an exciting list of courses lined up for Fall 2022. Once you have decided which courses you want to take, click on the “Register for Courses” button. It will take you to the registration program. Fall 2022 registration will open at 10:00 AM on August 1.

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This fall, DavidsonLearns is excited to offer a fascinating selection of in-person and online courses. Before registering for any of these courses you first must have a DavidsonLearns account and be a current DavidsonLearns member. We encourage you to take care of both of these requirements now in order to avoid a delay when you register. If you need to create an account or become a DavidsonLearns member (or renew your membership), click here.

 

To register for an in-person course, you must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19. During registration for these courses, you will be asked to affirm that you are fully vaccinated. We rely on participants to report their vaccination status accurately. You do not need to be vaccinated in order to register for an online course. At this time, masks are optional but encouraged. However, this policy is subject to change.

 

Online courses meet as a video conference on a Zoom platform. We encourage you to download and install the free Zoom application now. Click here for instructions.

​If you would like to take a course that is full, please add your name to the waitlist, and we will contact you if a seat becomes available. Please do not contact the instructor directly.

In-Person Extended Courses

Adventures in Genealogy

Status: Closed

Genealogy has become America’s fastest growing hobby.  The construction of your tree brings together your own family stories with the powerful search engines of the internet to produce a lifetime challenge of massive breadth and depth.

 

We will sample the most popular genealogical websites as well as some unusual ones. This course is open to all, from beginners to professionals, and encourages an interactive, seminar-sized exploration of your ancestors as well as their lives and times.  A “Time Line” for your ancestors will connect you with the geography, history, and culture in which they lived.  What did great-grandpa do for a living?  How big was his family?  Were they rich or poor?  What was his religion?  And how did that all fit in with the majority of the local population?  Can you discover genealogy’s “Holy Grail,” great-grandma’s home town somewhere in the world?

 

Participants are encouraged to use personal laptops in class, working on their own projects while learning from conversation with others in the group.

Suggested Readings

Several suggested texts will be available for examination at the first class.  Students may want to obtain a copy of one of them.

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 6, Max 12 students

Day

Wednesday

Time

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Dates

Oct. 19, 26; Nov. 2, 9, 16

Status: Closed

Around the Charlotte Region in Five Days

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Wednesday

Time

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Dates

Oct. 12, 19, 26; Nov. 2, 9

The Charlotte region (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) is one of the fastest growing areas in the United States. Using Dr. McCoy’s personal experience working directly with city, town, and county governments in the region and using information from the regional archives of the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute, we will explore the history of the region and how it fits into the state’s context.  This examination will include issues stemming from Charlotte’s rapid growth (jobs, housing, crime, education, transportation), from historical development patterns in the surrounding eight counties, and from the way rural surrounding areas connect to Charlotte.  Also, because tourism plays a major role in the region’s economy, we will discuss what there is to see and do around the region.

 

This course is primarily lecture but includes some group participation.

Suggested Readings

The instructor will suggest articles from the UNC Charlotte’s Urban Institute’s Website, https://ui.charlotte.edu/articles-research, and provide a short bibliography of books.

Instructor: Bill McCoy, PhD

Status: Closed

Born in the USA: American Popular Music in the 20th Century

Cost

$77

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 15 students

Day

Tuesday

Time

6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Dates

Oct. 11, 18, 25; Nov. 1, 8, 15, 22

America's music in the 20th century tells the singular story of how people from different backgrounds and experiences have come together to create a uniquely American art form. In this course, we’ll explore the ways popular music influenced and was influenced by the remarkable events of “The American Century,” a time when the US was the dominant nation in the world in terms of politics, economics, science, and popular culture. We’ll consider the American musical scene through the lenses of civil rights and racism, feminism, technological change, and national politics.

 

This course is primarily lecture but includes some group participation.

Required Readings

There are no required readings, but students are encouraged to create a Spotify account to listen to playlists of music relevant to each lesson (available for free with ads and other limitations or by subscription with no ads and more features). Instruction for using Spotify will be provided. The instructor will provide a list of readings, films, videos, podcasts, sites, and music that can be accessed via the internet from sources such as AllMusic.com and the podcast A History of Rock Music in 500 Songs.

 

Suggested Readings

Starr, Larry and Christopher Waterman. American Popular Music: From Minstrelsy to Mp3. Oxford University Press, 2021.

 

This book may also be available from other sources.

Instructor: Rachel Stewart

Status: Closed

Campaign Strategies in the 21st Century: How You Decide What You Decide

Cost

$44

Location

Enrollment

Min 10, Max 25 students

Day

Wednesday

Time

6:00 PM - 7:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 14, 21, 28; Oct. 5

Personalities, unforeseen events, or the so-called “winds of fate” can sometimes decide an election, but most often they are won or lost as a result of campaign strategy.  Currently, Democrats and Republicans alike are weighing how to craft their campaigns in the shadow of Donald Trump.

 

This course will explore the contours of campaign strategies with an emphasis on 21st century techniques. We will examine the supposed tension between the gurus (such as Karl Rove and James Carville) and the geeks (algorithm analysts using big data). We will cover a variety of topics including campaign communication, microtargeting, the use of campaign consultants, negative campaigning, opposition research, the strategic use of old and new media, voter mobilization, and campaign finance.

 

We will ask some larger questions in the context of these topics. In the age of polarization and partisan antipathy, do campaigns matter? Which matters more -- the campaign or the candidate? To what extent can we consider voter rights and gerrymandering as a campaign strategy? What are the impacts of modern campaigns on democracy itself?

 

This course is primarily lecture but includes some group participation.

 

Required Readings

Short assigned readings will come from articles that can be accessed on the internet.

Instructor: Susan Roberts, PhD

Status: Closed

The Christian Tradition and Racist Thinking

Cost

$44

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Thursday

Time

3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Dates

Oct. 20, 27; Nov. 3, 10

This course explores how Christians have imagined racial and ethnic difference, beginning with the New Testament distinction between Jew and Gentile and continuing with ancient, medieval, and modern ways that Christians constructed differences between themselves and others.

 

This course is primarily lecture but includes some group participation.

 

Suggested Readings

Pagels, Elaine. The Origin of Satan: How Christians Demonized Jews, Pagans, And Heretics.  Vintage, 1996. 

 

This book may also be available from other sources.

Status: Closed

The Cold War on the Silver Screen

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 18 students

Day

Tuesday

Time

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Dates

Oct. 18, 25; Nov. 1, 8, 15

The Cold War took place on many levels: ideological, military, economic, geopolitical, and cultural. It was a time of Churchill's iron curtain speech, McCarthyism, show trials, covert action by the CIA and the KGB, fears of nuclear annihilation, and the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall. This course explores this history by examining five iconic movies that shed light on the anxieties of the Cold War: The Third Man, The Manchurian Candidate, Dr. Strangelove, The Man Who Saved the World, and Goodbye, Lenin! Participants will watch movies at home using a streaming service and discuss them in class.

Required Readings

The films can be rented, purchased, or streamed from various sources such as iTunes, Vudu, Amazon Prime, Google Play, YouTube, and for some, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Library.

Suggested Readings

Chopra-Gant, Mike. Cinema and History: The Telling of Stories. Wallflower, 2008

 

McMahan, Robert J. The Cold War: A Very Short Introduction. 2nd ed., Oxford University Press, 2021.

 

These books may also be available from other sources.

Status: Closed

Conversations in Classical Chinese Poetry and Literature

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 8 students

Day

Monday

Time

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 19, 26; Oct. 3, 10, 17

Travel back in time for a glimpse at early Chinese culture, as expressed through poetry and literature, with a professor, poet, and translator who has traveled, studied, and taught in China. The course opens with an article on T'ang poet Li Po's mastery of the quatrain as a reflection of Chinese poetic values. It then turns to the Book of Odes (c. 500 BCE) and moves through the centuries up to the T'ang and Sung poets. Participants will read aloud and discuss the literature and poetry of the week. There will be a wee bit of analytical and creative writing, applying concepts from Chinese literature and poetry.

Suggested Readings

The Columbia Book of Chinese Poetry: From Early Times to the Thirteenth Century. Translated and edited by Burton Watson, Columbia University Press, 1987.  This book may also be available from other sources.

 

Additional reading (handed out in class): Keep an Eye on South Mountain: Translations of Chinese Poetry. Translated by Gill Holland.

Instructor: Gill Holland, PhD

Status: Closed

Creative Approaches to Land Conservation

Cost

$44

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Thursday

Time

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Dates

Oct. 27; Nov. 3, 10, 17

The linkage between our sense of place, our health, and our natural landscapes is too important to leave to chance. Our threatened natural lands and trees are vital to our sense of place; and land development, once it happens, is effectively irreversible. Conservation protects important natural lands better than land use controls, which are subject to political shifts and uncertainty. This course will explore creative approaches to conservation via case studies in local and regional conservation, watershed protection, urban forestry, and related policy. The course will end with an optional field trip to Redlair Preserve (Gaston County) where participants can experience first-hand the human and natural history, as well as the community value, of this 1,400-acre extraordinary preserve.

 

This course is primarily lecture, but includes some group participation.

Suggested Readings

Participants will receive a suggested reading list in advance of the course.

Instructor: Dave Cable, MS

Status: Closed

The Economics of Immigration

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Thursday

Time

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Dates

Sep. 29, Oct; 6, 13, 20, 27

Why do people migrate? What is the impact of immigration on the residents of the host country? What is the impact of emigration on the residents of the home country? How does migration affect the migrants themselves? Using basic economic theory and data, we will study these questions and look at how migration can affect incomes, growth, and inequality within and across countries.

This course is primarily lecture but includes some group participation.

Suggested Readings

Nowrasteh, Alex and Benjamin Powell. Wretched Refuse? The Political Economy of Immigration and Institutions. Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 2020.

Pritchett, Lant. Let their People Come. Washington, DC, Center for Global Development, 2006. 

 

These books may also be available from other sources.

 

The instructor will provide a list of additional suggested readings.

Status: Closed

Intelligence and Espionage in the Cold War

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 10, Max 25 students

Day

Thursday

Time

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 22, 29; Oct. 6, 13, 20

The early Cold War was perhaps the most dangerous phase in the history of the world. Both the US and the USSR had thermonuclear war-heads on hair-trigger alert and nuclear-tipped missiles that could hit any target in the world within minutes. Intelligence helped to stabilize this dangerous standoff, as both superpowers and their allies relied heavily on intelligence to avoid a direct conflict. Early in the Cold War, the superpowers were unevenly matched in espionage. This course begins with the Soviets' deep penetration of the US government in the 1930-40s. We will examine the Cold War’s most important spy cases and covert operations, as well as the role of technological intelligence such as spy satellites, planes, submarines, and intercepts. We will also discuss Intelligence successes and failures on both sides. 

 

This course is primarily lecture, but includes some group participation.

Required Readings

The instructor will provide a reading list for those who wish to learn more about this topic.

Instructor: Thomas Rynne

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 10 students

Day

Wednesday

Time

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

Dates

Sep. 14, 21, 28; Oct. 5, 12

Everybody has a story. This workshop will help you identify your life stories – how to shape and share them. What are the high points and best memories? How have you learned from disappointment? For whom do you write? Perhaps you write for family and friends; perhaps you write for yourself. Here is the question: If you don’t tell your own story, who will tell it? The answer: someone who doesn’t know you.

Suggested Readings

Cameron, Julia. The Right to Write. Penguin Random House, 1999.

Sotomayor, Sonja.  My Beloved World. Penguin Random House, 2014.

Walls, Jeannette. The Glass Castle. Simon & Schuster, 2005.

 

These books may also be available from other sources.

Instructor: Jean Stewart Berg

Status: Closed

Memoir Writing Workshop: It's My Story and I'm Stickin' to It

Status: Closed

Modern Monetary Theory

Cost

$66

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Monday

Time

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Dates

Oct. 17, 24, 31; Nov. 7, 14, 21

Should the US be concerned about deficits? This course offers a critical look at Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), which contends that countries with sovereign currencies are not constrained by revenues when making spending decisions. MMT adherents argue that federal deficits do not matter. The first two weeks of the course provide background on monetary and fiscal policies necessary to understand MMT’s departure from the status quo. The remaining four weeks build upon Stephanie Kelton’s 2020 NY Times best-selling book, The Deficit Myth. No prior background in economics is required although material is of a somewhat technical nature.

Required Readings

Kelton, Stephanie. The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People's Economy. PublicAffairs, 2020.

This book may also be available from other sources.

Instructor: Ted Amato, PhD

Status: Closed

Perspectives on Traditional Music

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 10, Max 25 students

Day

Varies

Time

4:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 8, 14; Nov. 10; Feb. 22; Apr. 24

Students will explore the musical genre of Traditional Music through instructor lectures, discussions with performing artists, and attendance at four Traditional Music concerts at Davidson College. The first class, one week before the first concert, will introduce the genre and provide background on all the artists. The day before each concert, there will be a preparatory session in which students will learn more about the artists and their context within the genre. On the day of the concert, the class will meet for 45 minutes with the artists, who will give examples of what to expect in the upcoming performance.

Note that the course spans both semesters, but registration will occur only in the Fall.

Note also that the course fee does not include concert ticket prices, which are $22 General Admission ($17 for Seniors) or $75 General Series Subscription ($57 for Seniors).

September 8:           4:30-5:30: Class introduction

September 14:         4:30-5:30: Prep for Concert 1 (Temple Kol Tikvah)

September 15:         4:45: Class (Duke Family Performance Hall)

7:30: Concert 1 (Duke Family Performance Hall)

Ballads, Stories, and Songs from Madison County:  Sheila Kay Adams, Donna Ray Norton, and Josh Goforth. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COHmIj0TS88
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=goBKrrVvibc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5WPPT_bsAE

November 10:          4:30-5:30: Prep for Concert 2 (Temple Kol Tikvah)

November 11:          4:45: Class (Duke Family Performance Hall)

7:30: Concert 2 (Duke Family Performance Hall)

Bill and the Belles from Johnson City, TN.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIwfv2WxkDg

February 22:             4:30-5:30: Prep for Concert 3 (Temple Kol Tikvah)

February 23:             4:45: Class (Duke Family Performance Hall)

7:30: Concert 3 (Duke Family Performance Hall)

Breabach, a Celtic band from Scotland. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-reKi0Zwb0

April 24:                    4:30-5:30: Prep for Concert 4 (Temple Kol Tikvah)

April 25:                    4:45 Class (Duke Family Performance Hall)

7:30: Concert 4 (Duke Family Performance Hall)

Phil Wiggins and the Chesapeake Sheiks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EI09LAvIIV0

Required Readings

The instructor will provide a listening list on YouTube. 

Instructor: Bill Lawing, DMA

Cost

$66

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 12 students

Day

Tuesday

Time

1:00 PM - 2:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 27; Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25; Nov. 1

This class is a dialogue between students, poems, and materials provided by the instructor to help all participants find, as Samuel Coleridge put it, “the best words and the best order” for their own poems. Whether you’re an experienced poet or a novice, you will learn from reading selected poems, examining the work of each poet, creating your own poems, and engaging in conversation with other students about their work – all activities designed to enhance the development of your own writing through the lens of selected poets and class feedback. Poems will be from the work of W. H. Auden, Robert Frost, W. S. Merwin, John Balaban, Eleanor Wilner, Jamal May, Betty Adcock, Marilyn Nelson, Claudia Emerson, and others.

Required & Suggested Readings

All materials will be provided by the instructor.

Status: Closed

Poetry: The Best Word in the Best Order

Cost

$66

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Tuesday

Time

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Dates

Sep. 6, 13, 20, 27: Oct. 4, 11

Russia has, for centuries, tried to define itself vis-à-vis the West. This course examines central texts and historical narratives that the Putin regime leverages in its current war in Ukraine and its larger ideological battle against the West. It addresses “What is the ‘West’?”; “Who owns Kyivan Rus’?”; Peter the Great’s westernization of Russia; Slavophiles, Westernizers, and Eurasianists; the fall of the USSR; and Putin’s Russia.

Required Readings

The syllabus for required readings will be sent to registrants. Expect about 15-20 pages of material per class from accessible websites or instructor-provided pdfs.

Suggested Readings

The instructor will provide a list of suggested readings for those who are interested in additional background.

Status: Closed

Presidential Rhetoric & US Foreign Policy: From T. Roosevelt to Reagan

Cost

$44

Location

Enrollment

Min 10, Max 20 students

Day

Friday

Time

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Dates

Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28

Photography was past its infancy by the Civil War, when the field of photojournalism blossomed, documenting through the camera's lens the most consequential and astonishing events of the times. We'll look at the greatest news photography of three centuries, the photos that brought the world's events to the living room and many that would revolutionize the world in ways big and small, from Antietam to charming portraiture to the "special operation" in Ukraine. Some images we'll view of conflict and disaster contain strong content.

Required Readings

None

Instructor: Mark Washburn

Status: Closed

A Shutter Blinks and We Forever Gasp

Cost

$66

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 15 students

Day

Wednesday

Time

2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Dates

Sep. 28; Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26; Nov. 2

The American Civil War did not have one major turning point. Instead, the war unfolded as a continuum of events with several major turning points, each one leading to the next. Subsequently, a series of battles, decisions, and political acts (taken together) helped to shape the course of the war, the lives of the people, as well as the life of our country. Class discussions will be based on the nine essays found in the text. The instructor will add other turning points.

Required Readings

Mackowski, Chris and Kristopher D. White (Eds). Turning Points of the American Civil War. Southern Illinois Press, 2018. 

 

This book may also be available from other sources.

Instructor: Eric Hight

Status: Closed

Turning Points of the American Civil War (Tuesday evening)

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 10, Max 25 students

Day

Thursday

Time

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 15, 22, 29; Oct. 6, 13

In this course, we will examine how the war between Ukraine and Russia impacts the economy and trade in Ukraine, Russia, and nearby countries in the European Union who are now moving to divorce themselves from their extensive energy reliance on Russia. We will also look at the looming food crisis in developing countries that are heavily reliant on the importation of wheat and other agricultural products from Ukraine. We will discuss the development of the European Union in contrast with NATO and why Ukraine wishes to associate itself economically with the EU rather than Russia.

Suggested Readings

Students should be reading reports on this war, especially its economic implications with Europe and the developing world. The instructor will send students newspaper and periodical articles related to each week’s class discussion.

Instructor: Joe Papovich

Status: Closed

The War in Ukraine: Economic and Trade Policy Implications in Europe and Beyond

In this course, we will focus on key foreign policy speeches by American presidents in the era of the rhetorical presidency—from the early 20th century to the end of the Cold War.  We will reflect on how the rise of the so-called rhetorical presidency disrupted the founders’ vision by shifting power and authority over foreign policy from Congress to the presidency.  Presidents have exercised that power in major public addresses that articulate the principles, beliefs, values, and doctrines that define America’s role in the world.  From Theodore Roosevelt’s corollary to the Monroe Doctrine to the Reagan Doctrine that helped end the Cold War, the guiding principles behind American foreign policy have been forged not by deliberations with or within Congress but by presidents going over the heads of Congress with direct appeals to the American people. 

Required Readings

Selected speeches and commentaries on the Voices of Democracy website (https://voicesofdemocracy.umd.edu/), a free, open-access website created by the instructor with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Status: Closed

Russia and the West

Cost

$55

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 20 students

Day

Friday

Time

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Dates

Sep. 16, 23, 30; Oct. 7, 14

Online Extended Courses

Status: Closed

The Rynne Lectures in International Affairs

Global hot spots are shaping future policies about national security and diplomacy for the US. Current faculty members from Davidson College, some of whom have advised policymakers in Washington, DC, will provide insight into these issues in a 4-session course. Topics followed by Q & A will include

 

  • US-China Tension is Still Rising (Shelley Rigger, PhD)

  • Psychology of Political Leadership: Motives, Character Traits, and Ethics of Leaders (Besir Ceka, PhD)

  • The Present and Future of US Foreign Policy in the Middle East (Silvi Toska, PhD)

  • It's Africa's Century: Why Africa Will Take Center Stage in the Coming Decades (Ken Menkhaus, PhD)

Required or Suggested Readings 

None

Cost

$44

Location

online

Enrollment

Min 20, Max 50 students

Day

Monday

Time

7:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Dates

Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24

In-Person Mini-Courses

Status: Closed

Exhibitions and Conversations with Artists Katie St. Clair and Lorena Mal

Cost

$22

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 25 students

Day

Friday

Time

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Dates

Sep. 16

This mini-course will begin with a tour of exhibitions with two artists, Katie St. Clair, Assistant Professor of Art at Davidson College, and Lorena Mal, visiting artist from Mexico City. Formal presentations by the artists will be followed by conversations with them about their work. Katie St. Clair’s exhibition, “Lay of the Land,” features abstract mixed-media paintings and sculptural objects that were inspired by immersive experiences in nature, including recent visits to remote parts of Canada and Ireland. Lorena Mal is a Mexico-based artist whose works include photographs, drawings, and sculpture. Her exhibition, “Witness Trees,” explores two landscapes, Mexico and the Southeastern US, through diverse media.

 

The American Civil War did not have one major turning point. Instead, the war unfolded as a continuum of events with several major turning points, each one leading to the next. Subsequently, a series of battles, decisions, and political acts (taken together) helped to shape the course of the war, the lives of the people, as well as the life of our country. Class discussions will be based on the nine essays found in the text. The instructor will add other turning points.

Required Readings

Mackowski, Chris and Kristopher D. White (Eds). Turning Points of the American Civil War. Southern Illinois Press, 2018. 

 

This book may also be available from other sources.

Instructor: Eric Hight

Status: Closed

Turning Points of the American Civil War (Wednesday afternoon)

Cost

$66

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 15 students

Day

Tuesday

Time

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Dates

Sep. 27; Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25; Nov. 1

Status: Cancelled

Exhibition and Conversation with Artist Susan Harbage Page

Cost

$22

Location

Enrollment

Min 5, Max 25 students

Day

Friday

Time

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Dates

Oct. 14

The mini-course will focus on an exhibition by Susan Harbage Page, Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill. The exhibition, “Territorial Disputes: Embodied Cartography,” reflects the work of her US-Mexico Border Project. The exhibition showcases portions of her collection of over 1,000 found objects (e.g., shoes, religious items, passports) left behind by border crossers and selected photographs from her 15 years of intensive research for the project. Her formal presentation will be followed by questions and conversation with participants.